admin on April 17th, 2014

Photo courtesy of Wahoo Fitness

Photo courtesy of Wahoo Fitness

WIRED

Measures BMI as well as weight. Logs weigh-ins for up to 16 different users, and internal memory stores data even when their iOS devices are not present. App tracks each person’s progress toward meeting each one’s preset weight goal via time-based charts. Bluetooth pairing happens in-app. Nice glass look.

TIRED

Somewhat pricey, after all, for its simple task. Weight range is used to identify each individual, so multiple users within the same weight range need to identify themselves. Basic app, and it’s iOS only — an iPhone 4S, a 3rd gen iPad, or a 5th gen iPod Touch or later is required.

It used to be simple to weigh myself. I’d climb on my bathroom scale and my current weight (let’s not talk about it) would appear in an inch-wide window.

But times have changed. Now when I stand on a scale, I see not only my weight but also my body mass index (BMI) score, both displayed on a comparatively large 3-inch LCD screen. My scale also connects wirelessly to my smartphone, where an app keeps track of my pound-reduction progress (or lack thereof) by automatically generating charts and graphs.

It’s not that Wahoo Fitness’ Balance Smartphone Scale is any more difficult to use than a regular scale. It works as expected — just step on it. And at $80, it’s not too outrageously priced. It’s just that there’s more data generated,

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admin on April 15th, 2014

Roku streaming stick. Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Roku streaming stick. Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

WIRED

All the options of the Roku streaming ecosystem, but at half the cost of a Roku 3. Streams up to 1080p. Dual-band wireless is stable and steady. Compact design means the Roku Streaming Stick stays hidden out of sight at the back of your TV. All the USB power cables are included — batteries for the remote too.

TIRED

No private listening on the remote. If you’re getting lousy reception, you can’t move it around like you can a regular Roku box — it’s stuck in the back of your TV. Odd shape may prove a tight fit depending on the alignment of your TV’s HDMI ports. The stick gets HOT. Casting isn’t as smooth as it should be.

Into the world of pucks, a stick arrives.

This stick is no stooge. It has the brains of a puck, and most of the brawn. It also has a few unique tricks of its own. But because it’s a stick, it’s cheaper and simpler, and therefore a great option for people new to the whole puck-and-stick streaming game.

The stick in question is the new Roku Streaming Stick, a simple $50 device that’s roughly double the size of a USB thumb drive. It plugs into the HDMI port on your television (any HDMI port — it doesn’t require an MHL port like last year’s version did) and it gives you all of the

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Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

SIMILAR GALLERIES

A Science Experiment From Your Childhood, Turned Into Gorgeous Photographs

A Science Experiment From Your Childhood, Turned Into Gorgeous Photographs

The Real Medical Conditions Behind the Deformed Hands in Rodin’s Sculptures

The Real Medical Conditions Behind the Deformed Hands in Rodin’s Sculptures

China’s Assembly-Line Artists Put the Mass in Masterpieces

China’s Assembly-Line Artists Put the Mass in Masterpieces

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Marvel Comics’ 10 Greatest Political Jabs Ever

15 Hilariously Bad Designs for Everyday Objects

15 Hilariously Bad Designs for Everyday Objects

Beautiful Scenes<p>Read More at:: <a href=http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3928fd25/sc/28/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A40Cnikon0Edf0E20C/story01.htm

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

SIMILAR GALLERIES

A Science Experiment From Your Childhood, Turned Into Gorgeous Photographs

A Science Experiment From Your Childhood, Turned Into Gorgeous Photographs

The Real Medical Conditions Behind the Deformed Hands in Rodin’s Sculptures

The Real Medical Conditions Behind the Deformed Hands in Rodin’s Sculptures

China’s Assembly-Line Artists Put the Mass in Masterpieces

China’s Assembly-Line Artists Put the Mass in Masterpieces

Marvel Comics’ 10 Greatest Political Jabs Ever

Marvel Comics’ 10 Greatest Political Jabs Ever

15 Hilariously Bad Designs for Everyday Objects

15 Hilariously Bad Designs for Everyday Objects

Beautiful Scenes<p>Read More at:: <a href=http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3928fd25/sc/28/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A40Cnikon0Edf0E20C/story01.htm

admin on April 4th, 2014

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

Photos by Porsche Cars North America

SIMILAR GALLERIES

China’s Assembly-Line Artists Put the Mass in Masterpieces

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Marvel Comics’ 10 Greatest Political Jabs Ever

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15 Hilariously Bad Designs for Everyday Objects

http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/38fb8e5e/sc/31/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A40Cporsche0E9180Espyder0E20C/story01.htm

Photo by Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo by Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

WIRED

Multi-faceted radar/laser detector pairs with your smartphone to give you audio and visual alerts as you drive. Get live road maps and GPS routing, live traffic info, and alerts about red light cameras and traps from a constantly updated, community-reported database. There’s a car finder too. Works with iOS and Android. Works as a regular radar detector if you don’t have a phone.

TIRED

Features take time to learn and program. Menus on the phone app are layered, so adjustment requires stopping the car. Supplied windshield suction feet suck, but not in the good way — and mounting it improperly can win you a citation.

I’ve recently learned that mounting a radar detector in your car isn’t just about fooling the fuzz. Sure, use one and you’ll be better equipped to avoid any number of very expensive moving violation tickets. But if you use a detector that pairs with your smartphone like Cobra’s iRad 230, you get a host of fringe benefits too: crowdsourced speed trap warnings, live maps with traffic info, and a more refined experience overall. It’s like Siri for giving Smokey the slip.

To test iRad, I plotted a circuit north out of San Francisco and through Napa Valley, on roads known to be littered with radar detection equipment and red light cameras. The $100 unit, a 5.5-ounce plastic box about the size of a pack of Marlboros, attaches to the windshield

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admin on April 2nd, 2014

Microsoft's new CEO Satya Nadella struck a more humble tone at Build 2014. Photo: Eric Risberg/AP

Microsoft’s new CEO Satya Nadella struck a more humble tone at Build 2014. Photo: Eric Risberg/AP

Microsoft today is friendly and approachable. It’s peculiar and self-aware. It makes fun of itself. When Terry Myerson, an executive vice president in its OS group, took the stage at its Build developer conference, he joked that he should have come out chanting “Developers, developers, developers.” It was a friendly jibe at the company’s recently departed CEO Steve Ballmer, but it was also revealing look at where the company’s head is at: a formerly all-business organization, known for bullying even, that’s learned from its past and is trying really hard to be everyone’s friend.

It gave a free Xbox One to everyone attending Build, plus a $500 gift card to the Microsoft Store so they can purchase any device. A bribe? Maybe. But I think Microsoft would argue that it’s a friendly gesture from a friendlier company. One where there were no snarky slaps at competitors, where there was confidence without the braggadocio.

Instead, we saw the company’s new CEO, Satya Nadella, onstage answering questions from developers. “What’s the best way for me to have a dialogue with 5,000 of my closest developer friends,” he asked. He leads a Microsoft that’s lost much of the swagger and surety it demonstrated for much of the past 20 years, replaced with a

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admin on March 27th, 2014

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIREDPhoto: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

WIRED

Classic, understated Lenovo styling. Impressive performance and a gorgeous screen, though it might be a bit too finely detailed for peripheral-free use.

TIRED

Anemic battery life. Power/volume buttons are difficult to access.

While the rest of the industry is busy making larger and larger tablets, some Windows 8 tablet makers are downsizing. The results are promising.

Putting full-bore Windows 8 on an 8-inch tablet that weighs less than a pound is no easy feat. But with the ThinkPad 8, Lenovo has crammed an awful lot of computer into a tiny, unobtrusive package — just 5.2 x 8.8 x 0.35 inches in size, and a bit over 14 ounces in heft.

The ThinkPad 8 uses the new third-generation Intel Atom CPU running at 1.46GHz. Two gigabytes of RAM are installed, and a 64GB SSD (upgradable to 128GB) is standard. The real standout, though, is the screen. With native resolution of an extra-wide 1920 x 1200 pixels, it packs more pixels into 8.3 inches of screen real estate than many laptops with more than twice the display surface area. The screen is impressively bright, and the 10-finger touchscreen is responsive, making this a beautiful tablet for watching media or playing a few games.

What else you might do with the ThinkPad 8 is the bigger question. And it’s a challenge that’s already endemic to the 8-inch Windows tablet space

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admin on March 25th, 2014

Photo: Ariel Zambelich/WIREDPhoto: Ariel Zambelich/WIRED

Photo: Ariel Zambelich/WIRED

WIRED

Highly refined hardware with a beautiful all-metal finish. Excellent battery life. Sense has been streamlined even further, with a cleaner Blink interface and new launch gestures. Good speakers for a phone.

TIRED

Camera still disappoints. Some of the features are gimmicks and not useful beyond impressing the other guests at the pool party. Skip the plastic Dot case accessory — it’s cool, but way too expensive.

The new HTC One is a very, very nice phone. It has even better hardware than last year’s model, and a few new smart and well-chosen software tricks. Some of the new software are mere gimmicks, but in the time I spent testing it, I came away more pleased then puzzled.

To put the HTC One through its paces, I took it to the happiest place on earth: Disneyland. It ended up being a great proving ground, especially for the camera, the usability of the the Sense interface, and the battery. I can report that overall, this is a solid, though relatively unexciting, upgrade to the previous One. It is instantly one of the two or three best Android handsets out there, and worth a look when it becomes available across all major U.S. carriers (prices will vary between $200 and $250). It goes on sale today, with a Google Play Edition coming soon. HTC could have pushed the camera

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Photo: Ariel Zambelich/WIREDPhoto: Ariel Zambelich/WIRED

Photo: Ariel Zambelich/WIRED

WIRED

Stellar battery life — lasts multiple days with heavy use. Beautiful 2,560 x 1,600 WQXGA display is great for watching video or multitasking. MicroSD for additional storage.

TIRED

Some apps and design features seem more suited to a mouse pointer and PC than a tablet. Hefty price tag. Occasional performance issues.

“Bigger is better.” That’s the mantra smartphone makers have taken to heart over the past few years. The tablet industry, meanwhile, has mostly focused on making pint-size, portable slates like the iPad mini and the Nexus 7. Not anymore.

With a shift to the pro and enterprise audience, Samsung’s Galaxy Note Pro is clearly going after Microsoft’s Windows 8 and Surface tablet market. That is, PC users who want PC features on a tablet, too. The Note Pro comes with a 12.2-inch display — the better for multitasking, and actually getting things done, the Korean company hopes. It also comes preloaded with a variety of enterprise-friendly software, including Hancom Office (a Microsoft Office-like publishing suite), remote PC capabilities, e-Meeting, and WebEx. With a display the size of many notebook screens, it’s not surprising that the Galaxy Note Pro tries to emulate a variety of traditionally PC functions. But unfortunately, it doesn’t quite measure up.

The Galaxy Note Pro may be an undeniably big tablet, but while it looks unwieldy, its slenderness and weight make it more

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