admin on December 19th, 2014

yotaphone-ft

Yota Devices

WIRED

A solid phone with a unique second e-paper screen. Battery life is way beyond every expectation. Reading books, documents and even social media messages on the electronic paper display leaves the eyes less fatigued. It’s like a mini Kindle, or like adding real smartphone functions to an e-reader. Smart notification features. Lots of customizability.

TIRED

The “YotaPanels” and some of their options are tricky to manage. Camera isn’t great. Software is still buggy: reading a notification from the e-paper display doesn’t always clear it from the main notification bar. Traces of previous images stay impressed on the EDP screen for minutes, negatively impacting readability.

You’re being busy on your phone—texting, writing emails, occasionally checking Facebook. But your taps and swipes are cautious. You’re growing more anxious by the minute. Your battery is about to die.

This has certainly happened to each and every one of you. It’s happened to me countless times, usually at the airport while waiting for delayed flights with no free outlets to charge up. (When will people learn to share?)

But the last time I found myself stranded at the airport unable to charge up, I wasn’t worried. I was multitasking: I had Spotify in my ears while checking emails, browsing Twitter, Facebook, and the Web. After four hours of intense usage I was still seated in front of the flight information display with 80 percent of battery life. Amazing.

How was I capable of such

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admin on December 17th, 2014

skylinkHome-sa

Liana Bandziulis / WIRED

WIRED

Control all of your home alarm and security settings from your iPhone. Easy install using the app and the printed guide. Easy activation through the app. Big, easy-to-find arm/disarm button. Hub has back-up batteries. With an external dialer, the hub can call you if the power goes down in your home.

TIRED

No Android support yet. There isn’t a tablet-specific version of the app or a Web app. Doesn’t come with batteries, and they’re not lithium. The siren is piercing when you’re next to it, but not quite loud enough to be easily heard outside the home.

I’m a control freak when it comes to home alarm systems. Sure, I could pay one of the big alarm companies like ADT or Vivint to come wire up my house, place a control panel in my hallway, and send the police over when Cousin Ted trips the alarm by accident. Apart from the high monthly fees (around $30 or $40 per month), I don’t like the idea of a contracted installer being the only person who understands how the wires, sensors, and control panels all work.

That’s why, when I heard about the SkylinkNet app-controlled home alarm system, I had to give it a try. I wanted to install my own hardware, set my own alarm, and monitor my own house using my iPhone, skipping the security console in the hallway entirely.

The Starter Kit includes one

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admin on December 11th, 2014

chromebook-inline

Samsung

WIRED

A solid, well-built chassis give this Chromebook a more serious feel (faux leather, not so much). Impressive battery life means you can leave the cord at home. The price is right.

TIRED

2GB of RAM. Really Samsung? Really? TN display just barely qualifies as HD. Lack of standard SD Card slot means you’ll need an USB adapter.

I was a little surprised by the arrival of a brand new Chromebook with a Samsung badge on the lid. The Korean giant was a great friend to Google in the earliest days of its web-based operating system, releasing a stream of consumer-ready Chromebooks, including the first sub-$250 Chromebook worth buying.

But Samsung recently announced it would dramatically cut back its Windows laptop production, and the company even gutted its European Chromebook output. Here in the States, however, we’re still getting Chromebooks from Samsung—and pretty nice ones at that.

The latest in the Samsung Chromebook line is the Samsung Chromebook 2. I tested the XE500C12-K01US model, which features a 2.16 GHz Intel Bay Trail chip, a regrettably paltry 2GB of RAM, a 16GB flash drive, and a 1366 x 768 pixel 11.6-inch display.

The hardware does not put this in the top caliber of Chromebooks, but on the plus side that power-sipping Bay Trail chip does give this Chromebook close to the nine hours of battery life Samsung claims.

The other main selling point here is the low price. Samsung is offering the

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admin on December 10th, 2014

A prototype version of the Stryd. Athlete Architect expects to make additional design changes before full production begins.

A prototype version of the Stryd. Athlete Architect expects to make additional design changes before full production begins. Athlete Architect

WIRED

New data channel for runners—power—could help beginners and serious competitors coach themselves to optimal pace. One-year battery life. Just clip it and go. Compatible with iPhone and Android as well as Bluetooth LE and ANT+ devices such as Garmin and Suunto wristtops.

TIRED

Alpha hardware is hard to clip on. Calorie totals seemed strangely low (company says it’s tweaking the software). Data presentation currently geared toward rookies, though the device may one day offer sophisticated gait analysis. Alpha phone app is crude and hokey.

The problem with running is that there’s no way to constantly adjust your effort for best results. You often go out too slow or too fast, then feel awful—or worse, get hurt and leave the sport for good. A long list of heart rate monitors and GPS trackers have attempted to quantify performance, but none of them telegraph one simple metric tailored to a runner’s own body.

In the crowded field of wearable plastic gizmos, a new device promises to give you an objective number to guide your runs. Stryd, from startup Athlete Architect, borrows the idea of “power” from competitive cyclists (or maybe Nietzschean scholars), and applies it to running. Power is the kinetic

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admin on December 6th, 2014

Etymotic’s Music PRO electronic earplugs are made for professional musicians. They let you temper the sound around you, keeping it at safe levels without sacrificing much audio quality.

Etymotic’s Music PRO electronic earplugs are made for professional musicians. They let you temper the sound around you, keeping it at safe levels without sacrificing much audio quality. Etymotic

WIRED

A great choice for professional musicians, stage crew, and frequent show-goers who want hi-fidelity hearing protection. Off-the-shelf option; less hassle than custom-fitting plugs. Switchable -9dB/-15dB modes mean versatile protection in multiple situations—great if you find yourself in large halls, small clubs, or outdoor venues on different dates. Lots of tips, including Comply foam, to get the best fit.

TIRED

Overall response is natural, but the internal circuitry does color the sound. Active dynamic compression can be distracting. Expensive–passive custom-fit models are about the same price.

Being a working musician will make you deaf. That’s the underlying reality of what is otherwise a very romantic and enviable profession—playing gigs in front of grateful audiences night after night. So, any pro musician wanting keep the train rolling will take the necessary precaution of wearing hearing protection.

But we’re not the only ones who should be worried about our ears. It’s probably louder out there in the audience than it is on the stage. In fact, if you’re a fan of live music or if you play it—for a living, or just once in

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admin on December 5th, 2014

large01

LG

WIRED

Much better than the first G Watch. Epic battery life. Zippier processor than its smartwatch competition. Comes with a barometric altimeter for quick elevation checks. OLED display produces nice inky blacks.

TIRED

Almost twice as heavy as the Moto 360. Leather wristband feels like a cardboard strap. Crashy. Screen sensitivity issues.

Despite being one of the first two Android Wear watches you could buy, LG didn’t really make much of a splash with the original G Watch. It was pretty bland-looking, particularly when compared to the beautiful round Moto 360. Now, LG is back with a round watch of its own.

The LG G Watch R, which, despite having too many individually separate letters in a single product name, is undeniably a massive improvement over the original G Watch. The only problem is that’s actually not much of an achievement. The better way to measure its worth is to compare it to the current smartwatch it-girl, the Moto 360. Let’s start with looks.

Both watches are made of stainless steel, and both feel very solid. The 360 has a very thin bezel (which comes in silver or dark gray), whereas the G Watch R is thicker, and has some numbers permanently etched into the rim. This looks pretty good if you choose a watch face with analog hands, but it seems superfluous and out of place if you have a digital clock.

The G Watch R is a

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admin on December 4th, 2014

Ody-C

Ody-C Image Comics

It’s not always easy figuring out what comics to read. So we’ll keep it simple: If you’re only going to pick up a couple of titles right now, here are a handful that are worth your time and money. Of course, there’s absolutely no way to cover every comic, so consider this a monthly sampler—and leave your own suggestions in the comments.

Ody-C

A trippy, gender-flipped version of Homer’s Odyssey, Ody-C is an epic poem hurtling through space on psychedelic, science fiction wings. Scripted by Hawkeye and Sex Criminals writer Matt Fraction, it recasts Homer’s male roles—heroes, villains, and gods—as women, transforming the hypermasculine battles of the ancient Greeks into a feminine but equally bloody affair. Instead of sacking the city of Troy, Odyssia leads her army to conquer the distant planet of Troila; instead of sailing across oceans, they sift through space in a ship powered by the minds of the crew. Here, mutiny isn’t just an action but a crime of the mind, and one equally punishable by death. Knowing the classics helps, but if Christian Ward’s art turns your crank, it might be worth learning them just to take the ride.

Price: $3.99
Date: Available now
Where to Buy It: Image Comics, your local comics shop

The-Kitchen

Vertigo Comics

The Kitchen

Set in Hell’s Kitchen during the iconically criminal 1970s, this new Vertigo comic

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admin on December 2nd, 2014

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

The new Nexus 6 phone from Google. It runs the new Android 5.0, Lollipop. Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

From left, Nexus 6 vs iPhone 6. Mat Honan

Mat Honan

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

SIMILAR GALLERIES

WIRED Space Photo of the Day for December 2014

WIRED Space Photo of the Day for December 2014

Gift Guide: 9 Retro Presents for the Hipster in Your Life

Gift Guide: 9 Retro Presents for the Hipster in Your Life

8 Strange New<p>Read More at:: <a href=http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/40db04a4/sc/28/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C110Cgoogle0Enexus0E60C/story01.htm

admin on December 1st, 2014

Before Cooper left his daughter to find humanity a new home in space, there were the Lazarus missions. Led by Dr. Mann, this was NASA’s first attempt to locate a hospitable exoplanet. So what happened to Mann on the other side of the wormhole? We teamed Christopher Nolan with award-winning comic-book artist Sean Gordon Murphy to tell Mann’s story.

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giorgio-74

RCA Records

We woke up yesterday to something wondrous. No, it wasn’t that Jaden and Willow Smith interview; it was the news that Giorgio Moroder would be releasing a new solo album after more than 30 years. It’s not like he’s been away for that long, but we have to wonder how he’d feel about today’s electronic/beats-dominated landscape. Based on this week’s playlist, we’re guessing the answer is “pleased and mustachioed.” There’s a stellar cover from Janine and the Mixtape, an equally Nick Catchdubs remix of Dej Loaf’s inescapable “Try Me,” and a track off of E-40’s forthcoming double album that we haven’t been able to take off repeat for a week now. And that’s just 30 percent of the week’s offerings!

As usual, we’ve added the tracks to our ongoing Spotify playlist of great new music, and created a standalone playlist (below). Keep the recommendations coming.

The tracks:
Janine and the Mixtape, “You Got it Bad xx”
Slow Magic, “Waited 4 U (ODESZA Remix)”
Lolawolf, “What Love Is”
E-40, “Choices”
Ghostface Killah, “Love Don’t Live Here No More”
Charli XCX “Gold Coins”
Giorgio Moroder, “74 is the New 24″
A$AP Ferg, “Doe-Active”
Dej Loaf, “Try Me (Nick Catchdubs Jersey Gardens Mix)”
Monster Rally Jay Stone feat. Brandon Rayson, “Cognac”

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