Lamborghini’s angular new Huracán LP 610-4 visually references the fierceness of its predecessor, the Gallardo. Lamborghini

Lamborghini

The new Lambo is distinctly less wild, filled with refinements like electronically adjustable suspension, a smooth-shifting dual-clutch transmission, and available variable-ratio steering. Basem Wasef

Basem Wasef

The coddling gizmos beg the question: Has Lamborghini gone soft on us? Basem Wasef

Basem Wasef

What the Huracán gives up in wildness, it gains in practicality. The optional adjustable suspension can be softened up for potholed roads, transforming this from a teeth-chattering thoroughbred to a laid back cruiser. Lamborghini

Lamborghini

The revised driver interface takes a cue from Ferrari, eliminating steering wheel stalks by moving controls for wipers, headlights, and turn signals onto the wheel. Lamborghini

Lamborghini

The new, naturally aspirated 5.2-liter V10 engine bucks the turbocharging trend du jour and yields 610 metric horsepower. Lamborghini

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admin on August 29th, 2014

2014-08-27-htc-phone-1

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

WIRED

Affordable $100 price tag for a premium piece of hardware. Stellar battery life and solid performance. Impressive audio for a smartphone.

TIRED

Overall camera quality is meh, and could use better image stabilization. Windows Phone platform still lacks many big-name app and game titles.

After a successful debut on Android, HTC re-architected its second-generation HTC One for the Windows Phone platform. The result: Gorgeous, flagship-level hardware repainted with a fresh interface.

Windows Phone has been struggling to gain market share in the U.S., especially among high-end handset buyers. Now, those itching to give the mobile OS a try have another high-end hardware option: the HTC One. While the overall hardware and software experience is great, the phone does have a few annoying quirks.

The Windows Phone-equipped version of the HTC One, like its Android counterpart, is an incredibly handsome smartphone. The front is dominated by a 5-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 LCD display. The rear is a brushed metal plate punctuated by stripes of black banding near the top and bottom of the device that wrap around its circumference to form the borders of the front display. The phone’s slender edges fit securely in one hand without feeling sharp, while a subtle chamfer along the top edge gleams smartly. The size, while too big for me to operate one-handed, is such that I could still fit it in my rear jeans pocket and jacket pockets.

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admin on August 22nd, 2014

2014-08-21-Samsung-tablet-inline1

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

WIRED

Beautiful high-resolution AMOLED displays. Absurdly thin and light. Expandable storage via MicroSD slot. Multi Window mode is a useful extra, as is SideSync if you own a Galaxy phone. Solid battery life.

TIRED

TouchWiz UI means there’s a bit of bloatware in the mix. That same plastic dimpled backing as the Samsung Galaxy S5 (although it does look better on these tablets).

Samsung makes a lot of different kinds of tablets. In fact, Samsung makes so many tablets that it’s hard for one lineup to stand out amongst the company’s offerings, let alone the competition.

But with the 8.4-inch ($400) and 10.5-inch Galaxy Tab S ($500), Samsung has managed to stand out quite a bit. They’ve also done it without resorting to ridiculous gimmicks. These Wi-Fi-only tablets are incredibly thin and incredibly light without sacrificing performance, and they come with two of the best-looking screens in the game.

Those beautiful displays are part of what make these tablets so thin and light. Both have 2,560 x 1,600 AMOLED screens that don’t require LED-backlight systems, which shaves thickness from their frames. True to OLED’s core strengths, they’re tack-sharp, vivid, and bright enough to view in sunlight. While both tablet screens have the same higher-than-high-def resolution, the 8.4-inch model has a higher pixel density due to its smaller size: 360ppi vs. 287ppi for the 10.5-incher.

The 8.4-inch Tab S weighs a mere 10.4 ounces and is 6.6mm thick, which

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admin on August 18th, 2014

20140701_Soundfreaq_Mini_Speaker_01

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

WIRED

Awesome sound for something slightly bigger than your laptop’s power brick. Bluetooth 4.0, works with almost any device. Over ten hours of battery life per charge. Button controls on the side for when your phone is out of reach. Rubber ring around the grille keeps it from moving around as it vibrates. Has a mic and works as a speakerphone.

TIRED

Does fine with classic rock, jazz, and mellower vibes, but it won’t bring out the nuances in your Merzbow MP3s. It wobbles when you tip it vertically, and it only really works well while sitting horizontally. Play button functions like a one-button remote on a smartphone, and can trigger the occasional pocket dial.

I’m crazy for portable Bluetooth speakers. They’re practical, they’re cute. They’re the type of gadget that works in every room—especially in places where you normally wouldn’t put a traditional sound system, like the kitchen, bathroom, basement, or back deck. Never mind the park, the beach, and the balcony at the HoJo.

As a result of my obsession, I have a great number of these speakers in my apartment (seven, by last count) and I’m always testing the new ones. This speaker, the Pocket Kick from Soundfreaq, has been my favorite new addition to the flock. It’s small (“pocket” is probably a misnomer, but it is very tiny), it costs $100, and the sound quality it produces puts it at the head of

Read More at:: http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3d9baf47/sc/28/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A80Csoundfreaq0Epocket0Ekick0C/story01.htm

admin on August 14th, 2014

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

SIMILAR GALLERIES

The Humble WWI Biplane That Helped Launch Commercial Flight

The Humble WWI Biplane That Helped Launch Commercial Flight

How to Create a Logo for a Space Engine That Physicists Can’t Explain

How to Create a Logo for a Space Engine That Physicists Can’t Explain

Stirring Portraits of People Forced to Live in Flooded Homes

Stirring Portraits of People Forced to Live in Flooded Homes

Read More at:: http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3d7f682e/sc/28/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A80Ctoshiba0Esatellite0Eradius0Ep55w0C/story01.htm

Kia’s K900 is its first full-size sedan made for the luxury market. Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

The interior is swanky, stuffed with Nappa leather and real wood. Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

The LED headlights swing to light the road as you turn. Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

The 119.9-inch “world-class”—Kia’s words—wheelbase puts it at the same scale as the A8, 750i, and LS460. It’s a touch taller than those cars, but its profile looks less boxy and lower to the ground. Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

19-inch, chrome-finished wheels come standard. Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

The car is nearly silent on the road, thanks to double-paned windows and foam insulation packed into key parts of the body. Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

“Power soft-close door latches” make the doors close so quietly it’s hard to believe they’re made of steel.

Read More at:: http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3d6bf8bf/sc/18/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A80Ckia0Ek90A0A0Eluxury0Ereview0C/story01.htm

20140801-SALEWA-SHOES-012edit

Ariel Zambelich/WIRED

WIRED

Form meets function with this high-tech, street-smart shoe. It will keep you warm and dry from a subway stop to an airport terminal and all the way to Positano, Italy, without sacrificing style. Plus, the Ramble is a lot of shoe for the $150 pricetag.

TIRED

It’s still a hiking-urban hybrid, which means that I’ll still have to pack strappy sandals and heavier-lugged hiking boots or running shoes for the trail.

When it comes to traveling, footwear is my Achilles heel. I’m usually heading off to a place where winter boots or lug-toed hiking shoes are a necessity. And since these heavy-duty shoes take up most of the space in my suitcase, I almost always wear them through airports, which feels like overkill, sort of like driving a Hummer on an LA Freeway. It’s always a little embarrassing that the airport waifs surrounding me at the x-ray machine are slipping off their strappy high-heeled sandals while I’m unlacing 10 pounds of Vibram soles.

The need to inhabit a variety of worlds when I travel is why I’m excited every time I find products where sophisticated design matches the sophistication of the technology. I love stuff that looks good and works well in the wild. Salewa’s new Ramble urban outdoor travel shoe, which comes in both men’s and women’s sizes, checks both those boxes.

The suede upper is all-Italian, with a low profile, an elegant

Read More at:: http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3d293f0f/sc/36/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A80Csalewa0Eramble0Eshoes0C/story01.htm

Enter the connected home through the biggest door in your house: the garage door.

Enter the connected home through the biggest door in your house: the garage door. Courtesy Iris/Lowe’s

WIRED

Open and close your home’s garage door from anywhere—inside the house, down the block, or in the Bahamas. Install takes only 20 minutes. Set rules for opening and closing automatically at specific times. No problems with interference. Controller connects to a smart-home hub for lights, motion sensing, and home alarm.

TIRED

Doesn’t auto-sense when you roll up the driveway. Requires connecting two wires into the garage door opener. Z-Wave platform is stable, but requires a dedicated hub that costs $100.

The final frontier of the connected home has nothing to do with thermostats, fancy doorbells, or smooth jazz coming out of your credenza.

If your domicile is large enough to also house a car or two, then the first and last portal you pass through every day is most likely your garage door. And when you and your Porsche (or Chevy Impala) roll to work or come home from the gym, you—being the owner of a fully-connected home—expect more than just an old-school remote-controlled garage door opener. You want something smarter. Something that not only opens and closes the door, but a device that can be controlled by your phone no matter where in the world you are. Such a device should also know when

Read More at:: http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3d15d157/sc/22/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A80Ciris0Ez0Ewave0Egarage0Edoor0Econtroller0C/story01.htm

admin on July 28th, 2014

Lenovo Y50. Photo: Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

Josh Valcarcel/WIRED

WIRED

Patterned, brushed metal lid is a unique and stylish design.

TIRED

Temperamental touchscreen and touchpad. Barely three hours of battery life. Some issues with temporary hanging at boot. Lackluster performance considering the price. Heavy at 5.8 pounds.

“Entry level” and “gaming machine” aren’t phrases that normally go together, and “Lenovo” isn’t typically a manufacturer that goes with either of them. Wisely ditching the ThinkPad brand is about the only decision that makes any sense around this oddball laptop—it’s just the Lenovo Y50. But all told, it’s an “entry level portable gaming machine” that is likely to appeal to absolutely no one.

The Y50 comes with three different display types: touch, non-touch, and 4K. For my tests, Lenovo supplied a Y50 Touch, the model with a 10-point touchscreen. Like you’d expect from Lenovo, it’s a jet black 15.6-inch notebook, but the similarities to the ThinkPad line end just about there. The bright red keyboard backlighting is an instant tip-off that this isn’t dad’s laptop. The curious beveling on the back of the laptop—highlighting some showy JBL speaker grilles—further attempts to step the Y50 away from the stodginess of the ThinkPad line’s business-minded aesthetics.

The Y50 features a few upgrades over the typical laptop, but as its “entry level” tagline implies, it’s hardly on the bleeding edge. The Core i7 CPU included, running at 2.4GHz, is one of the slowest versions of that chip

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admin on July 24th, 2014

nokia-phone-02

Maurizio Pesce/WIRED

WIRED

Very accessible price for 4G LTE networking and a fresh OS. Windows Phone updated to include Cortana, better notifications, and tighter integration with Microsoft cloud services. Colorful interchangeable covers, solid body. Support for up to 128GB of storage.

TIRED

Lacks a selfie camera, and rear-facing camera is not what you would expect from a Nokia. This is probably a phone more dedicated to social players than photo maniacs. Display is disappointing too.

Given the deep morass Nokia and Microsoft are currently slogging through—the blah earnings, the layoff plans, a still-small app store, general confusion—it’s refreshing to see that the mobile phone partnership is not all doom and gloom. The Lumia handsets are selling well and making waves in the mid-to-low-end smartphone market. Last year’s Lumia 520 in particular was a hit; Microsoft says over 12 million handsets were sold, and that success probably has very much to do with the phone’s sub-$150 price tag.

So here’s another Windows smartphone that should appeal the same crowd looking for inexpensive options: The Nokia Lumia 635. It’s among the first handsets to launch with the latest update of Windows Phone 8.1 software out of the box, along with its close relatives, the 3G-only Lumia 630 and the also-3G but smaller and weaker Lumia 530. All three are inexpensive (approaching $150, depending on the carrier) but the Lumia 635 is the only 4G phone

Read More at:: http://feeds.wired.com/c/35185/f/661463/s/3cd1d050/sc/5/l/0L0Swired0N0C20A140C0A70Cnokia0Elumia0E6350C/story01.htm